Arizona Cardiologists, Cardiology Clinics, Cardiology Doctors

i. Exercise Cardiolyte
Myocardial Perfusion Imaging (MPI) is a diagnostic procedure used to show how well your heart muscle is being supplied (perfused) with blood at rest and under stress. It shows areas of the heart that have reduced blood supply due to narrowing of one or more coronary arteries. A small amount of radioactive tracer is used to show the heart muscle. Areas of the heart receiving adequate blood flow are yellow on a monitor. Those with reduced flow are blue.

ii. Adenosine Cardiolyte
The purpose of this test is to assess the regional blood flow to the heart muscle both at stress and at rest and compare the two images to each other to allow an assessment of prior damage to the heart muscle (myocardial infarction) or a lack of enough blood flow to the heart muscle during exercise (myocardial ischemia). The test will be ordered by your doctor and is usually ordered to assess chest pain or other symptoms that may be related to your heart.

The test is not appropriate in patients who have asthma. Patients who use medications containing theophylline must be able to stop them for at least 48 hours prior to the test.

You will have a chemical stress test performed where you will be given a medication, adenosine, through a vein while having your electrocardiogram (ECG) monitored by a qualified staff person. It is important to let the staff know if you are having any symptoms during the test to allow them to better assess when to stop the test. You may be asked to exercise minimally following the injection to improve the quality of the study and lessen any potential side effects.

You may experience chest pain, palpitations, headache or a flushing feeling during the test. You may also feel short of breath. You should let the person performing the test know about these and any other symptoms you may experience during the test.

You may receive an additional injection of a drug called aminophylline if you are having a side effect from adenosine.

iii. Dobutamine Cardiolyte
The purpose of this test is to assess the regional blood flow to the heart muscle both at stress and at rest and compare the two images to each other to allow an assessment of prior damage to the heart muscle (myocardial infarction) or a lack of enough blood flow to the heart muscle during exercise (myocardial ischemia). The test will be ordered by your doctor and is usually ordered to assess chest pain or other symptoms that may be related to your heart.

The test may not be appropriate in patients who have had a recent heart attack, or who have glaucoma or irregular heart rhythms. If you have theses conditions please discuss this with the physician ordering the test. Some patients may be asked to stop taking a certain kind of medication (beta -blockers) by their physician prior to the test.

You will have a chemical stress test performed where you will be given a medication, dobutamine, through a vein while having your electrocardiogram monitored by a qualified staff person. It is important to let the staff know if you are having any symptoms during the test to allow them to better assess when to stop the test. Atropine may be given intravenously in order to further increase your heart rate.

During the test you may experience chest or arm pain or discomfort, palpitations, or other symptoms. It is important to let the person performing the test know about any symptoms you may be having so that they can determine when to stop the test. The person performing the test may need to take other measures to make you more comfortable.

iv. MUGA Scan
Gated blood pool study, also referred to as a MUGA study, provides information about the blood flow in the heart and the pumping function of the heart during rest and or exercise. ECG pads will be placed on the chest for an electrocardiogram. A small tube will be placed into an arm vein and the imaging agent will be injected into this tube. Images will be acquired for the resting part of the study. The nuclear medicine camera takes a series of images of the blood moving through the heart and records the motion of the heart at rest.